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  • Bouldering...
    Bouldering... .. is a style of rock climbing undertaken without a rope and normally limited to very short climbs over a crash pad so that a fall will not result in serious injury. Bouldering's documented origins may be found in Europe in the last quarter of the 19th century. The British coined the words bouldering and problem at that time. The first climber to actually make bouldering his primary specialty (in the mid 1950s) and to advocate its acceptance as a legitimate sport not restricted to a particular area was John Gill, a mathematician and amateur gymnast who found the challenge and movement of bouldering enjoyable. Boulder routes are commonly referred to as problems because the nature of the climb is often short, curious, and much like problem solving...
  • Bouldering...
    Bouldering... .. is a style of rock climbing undertaken without a rope and normally limited to very short climbs over a crash pad so that a fall will not result in serious injury. Bouldering's documented origins may be found in Europe in the last quarter of the 19th century. The British coined the words bouldering and problem at that time. The first climber to actually make bouldering his primary specialty (in the mid 1950s) and to advocate its acceptance as a legitimate sport not restricted to a particular area was John Gill, a mathematician and amateur gymnast who found the challenge and movement of bouldering enjoyable. Boulder routes are commonly referred to as problems because the nature of the climb is often short, curious, and much like problem solving...
  • Bouldering...
    Bouldering... .. is a style of rock climbing undertaken without a rope and normally limited to very short climbs over a crash pad so that a fall will not result in serious injury. Bouldering's documented origins may be found in Europe in the last quarter of the 19th century. The British coined the words bouldering and problem at that time. The first climber to actually make bouldering his primary specialty (in the mid 1950s) and to advocate its acceptance as a legitimate sport not restricted to a particular area was John Gill, a mathematician and amateur gymnast who found the challenge and movement of bouldering enjoyable. Boulder routes are commonly referred to as problems because the nature of the climb is often short, curious, and much like problem solving...
  • Bouldering...
    Bouldering... .. is a style of rock climbing undertaken without a rope and normally limited to very short climbs over a crash pad so that a fall will not result in serious injury. Bouldering's documented origins may be found in Europe in the last quarter of the 19th century. The British coined the words bouldering and problem at that time. The first climber to actually make bouldering his primary specialty (in the mid 1950s) and to advocate its acceptance as a legitimate sport not restricted to a particular area was John Gill, a mathematician and amateur gymnast who found the challenge and movement of bouldering enjoyable. Boulder routes are commonly referred to as problems because the nature of the climb is often short, curious, and much like problem solving...
  • Bouldering...
    Bouldering... ... is a style of rock climbing undertaken without a rope and normally limited to very short climbs over a crash pad so that a fall will not result in serious injury. Bouldering's documented origins may be found in Europe in the last quarter of the 19th century. The British coined the words bouldering and problem at that time. The first climber to actually make bouldering his primary specialty (in the mid 1950s) and to advocate its acceptance as a legitimate sport not restricted to a particular area was John Gill, a mathematician and amateur gymnast who found the challenge and movement of bouldering enjoyable. Boulder routes are commonly referred to as problems because the nature of the climb is often short, curious, and much like problem solving...
  • Bouldering...
    Bouldering... ... is a style of rock climbing undertaken without a rope and normally limited to very short climbs over a crash pad so that a fall will not result in serious injury. Bouldering's documented origins may be found in Europe in the last quarter of the 19th century. The British coined the words bouldering and problem at that time. The first climber to actually make bouldering his primary specialty (in the mid 1950s) and to advocate its acceptance as a legitimate sport not restricted to a particular area was John Gill, a mathematician and amateur gymnast who found the challenge and movement of bouldering enjoyable. Boulder routes are commonly referred to as problems because the nature of the climb is often short, curious, and much like problem solving...
  • Bouldering...
    Bouldering... ... is a style of rock climbing undertaken without a rope and normally limited to very short climbs over a crash pad so that a fall will not result in serious injury. Bouldering's documented origins may be found in Europe in the last quarter of the 19th century. The British coined the words bouldering and problem at that time. The first climber to actually make bouldering his primary specialty (in the mid 1950s) and to advocate its acceptance as a legitimate sport not restricted to a particular area was John Gill, a mathematician and amateur gymnast who found the challenge and movement of bouldering enjoyable. Boulder routes are commonly referred to as problems because the nature of the climb is often short, curious, and much like problem solving...
  • Bouldering...
    Bouldering... ... is a style of rock climbing undertaken without a rope and normally limited to very short climbs over a crash pad so that a fall will not result in serious injury. Bouldering's documented origins may be found in Europe in the last quarter of the 19th century. The British coined the words bouldering and problem at that time. The first climber to actually make bouldering his primary specialty (in the mid 1950s) and to advocate its acceptance as a legitimate sport not restricted to a particular area was John Gill, a mathematician and amateur gymnast who found the challenge and movement of bouldering enjoyable. Boulder routes are commonly referred to as problems because the nature of the climb is often short, curious, and much like problem solving...
  • Bouldering...
    Bouldering... ... is a style of rock climbing undertaken without a rope and normally limited to very short climbs over a crash pad so that a fall will not result in serious injury. Bouldering's documented origins may be found in Europe in the last quarter of the 19th century. The British coined the words bouldering and problem at that time. The first climber to actually make bouldering his primary specialty (in the mid 1950s) and to advocate its acceptance as a legitimate sport not restricted to a particular area was John Gill, a mathematician and amateur gymnast who found the challenge and movement of bouldering enjoyable. Boulder routes are commonly referred to as problems because the nature of the climb is often short, curious, and much like problem solving...
  • Bouldering...
    Bouldering... ... is a style of rock climbing undertaken without a rope and normally limited to very short climbs over a crash pad so that a fall will not result in serious injury. Bouldering's documented origins may be found in Europe in the last quarter of the 19th century. The British coined the words bouldering and problem at that time. The first climber to actually make bouldering his primary specialty (in the mid 1950s) and to advocate its acceptance as a legitimate sport not restricted to a particular area was John Gill, a mathematician and amateur gymnast who found the challenge and movement of bouldering enjoyable. Boulder routes are commonly referred to as problems because the nature of the climb is often short, curious, and much like problem solving...
  • Bouldering...
    Bouldering... ... is a style of rock climbing undertaken without a rope and normally limited to very short climbs over a crash pad so that a fall will not result in serious injury. Bouldering's documented origins may be found in Europe in the last quarter of the 19th century. The British coined the words bouldering and problem at that time. The first climber to actually make bouldering his primary specialty (in the mid 1950s) and to advocate its acceptance as a legitimate sport not restricted to a particular area was John Gill, a mathematician and amateur gymnast who found the challenge and movement of bouldering enjoyable. Boulder routes are commonly referred to as problems because the nature of the climb is often short, curious, and much like problem solving...
  • Bouldering...
    Bouldering... ... is a style of rock climbing undertaken without a rope and normally limited to very short climbs over a crash pad so that a fall will not result in serious injury. Bouldering's documented origins may be found in Europe in the last quarter of the 19th century. The British coined the words bouldering and problem at that time. The first climber to actually make bouldering his primary specialty (in the mid 1950s) and to advocate its acceptance as a legitimate sport not restricted to a particular area was John Gill, a mathematician and amateur gymnast who found the challenge and movement of bouldering enjoyable. Boulder routes are commonly referred to as problems because the nature of the climb is often short, curious, and much like problem solving...
  • Bouldering...
    Bouldering... ... is a style of rock climbing undertaken without a rope and normally limited to very short climbs over a crash pad so that a fall will not result in serious injury. Bouldering's documented origins may be found in Europe in the last quarter of the 19th century. The British coined the words bouldering and problem at that time. The first climber to actually make bouldering his primary specialty (in the mid 1950s) and to advocate its acceptance as a legitimate sport not restricted to a particular area was John Gill, a mathematician and amateur gymnast who found the challenge and movement of bouldering enjoyable. Boulder routes are commonly referred to as problems because the nature of the climb is often short, curious, and much like problem solving...
  • Bouldering...
    Bouldering... ... is a style of rock climbing undertaken without a rope and normally limited to very short climbs over a crash pad so that a fall will not result in serious injury. Bouldering's documented origins may be found in Europe in the last quarter of the 19th century. The British coined the words bouldering and problem at that time. The first climber to actually make bouldering his primary specialty (in the mid 1950s) and to advocate its acceptance as a legitimate sport not restricted to a particular area was John Gill, a mathematician and amateur gymnast who found the challenge and movement of bouldering enjoyable. Boulder routes are commonly referred to as problems because the nature of the climb is often short, curious, and much like problem solving...
  • Bouldering...
    Bouldering... ... is a style of rock climbing undertaken without a rope and normally limited to very short climbs over a crash pad so that a fall will not result in serious injury. Bouldering's documented origins may be found in Europe in the last quarter of the 19th century. The British coined the words bouldering and problem at that time. The first climber to actually make bouldering his primary specialty (in the mid 1950s) and to advocate its acceptance as a legitimate sport not restricted to a particular area was John Gill, a mathematician and amateur gymnast who found the challenge and movement of bouldering enjoyable. Boulder routes are commonly referred to as problems because the nature of the climb is often short, curious, and much like problem solving...
  • Bouldering...
    Bouldering... ... is a style of rock climbing undertaken without a rope and normally limited to very short climbs over a crash pad so that a fall will not result in serious injury. Bouldering's documented origins may be found in Europe in the last quarter of the 19th century. The British coined the words bouldering and problem at that time. The first climber to actually make bouldering his primary specialty (in the mid 1950s) and to advocate its acceptance as a legitimate sport not restricted to a particular area was John Gill, a mathematician and amateur gymnast who found the challenge and movement of bouldering enjoyable. Boulder routes are commonly referred to as problems because the nature of the climb is often short, curious, and much like problem solving...
  • Bouldering...
    Bouldering... ... is a style of rock climbing undertaken without a rope and normally limited to very short climbs over a crash pad so that a fall will not result in serious injury. Bouldering's documented origins may be found in Europe in the last quarter of the 19th century. The British coined the words bouldering and problem at that time. The first climber to actually make bouldering his primary specialty (in the mid 1950s) and to advocate its acceptance as a legitimate sport not restricted to a particular area was John Gill, a mathematician and amateur gymnast who found the challenge and movement of bouldering enjoyable. Boulder routes are commonly referred to as problems because the nature of the climb is often short, curious, and much like problem solving...
  • Bouldering
    Bouldering is a style of rock climbing undertaken without a rope and normally limited to very short climbs over a crash pad so that a fall will not result in serious injury. Bouldering's documented origins may be found in Europe in the last quarter of the 19th century. The British coined the words bouldering and problem at that time. The first climber to actually make bouldering his primary specialty (in the mid 1950s) and to advocate its acceptance as a legitimate sport not restricted to a particular area was John Gill, a mathematician and amateur gymnast who found the challenge and movement of bouldering enjoyable. Boulder routes are commonly referred to as problems because the nature of the climb is often short, curious, and much like problem solving...
  • Bouldering
    Bouldering is a style of rock climbing undertaken without a rope and normally limited to very short climbs over a crash pad so that a fall will not result in serious injury. Bouldering's documented origins may be found in Europe in the last quarter of the 19th century. The British coined the words bouldering and problem at that time. The first climber to actually make bouldering his primary specialty (in the mid 1950s) and to advocate its acceptance as a legitimate sport not restricted to a particular area was John Gill, a mathematician and amateur gymnast who found the challenge and movement of bouldering enjoyable. Boulder routes are commonly referred to as problems because the nature of the climb is often short, curious, and much like problem solving...
  • Bouldering
    Bouldering is a style of rock climbing undertaken without a rope and normally limited to very short climbs over a crash pad so that a fall will not result in serious injury. Bouldering's documented origins may be found in Europe in the last quarter of the 19th century. The British coined the words bouldering and problem at that time. The first climber to actually make bouldering his primary specialty (in the mid 1950s) and to advocate its acceptance as a legitimate sport not restricted to a particular area was John Gill, a mathematician and amateur gymnast who found the challenge and movement of bouldering enjoyable. Boulder routes are commonly referred to as problems because the nature of the climb is often short, curious, and much like problem solving...
  • Bouldering
    Bouldering is a style of rock climbing undertaken without a rope and normally limited to very short climbs over a crash pad so that a fall will not result in serious injury. Bouldering's documented origins may be found in Europe in the last quarter of the 19th century. The British coined the words bouldering and problem at that time. The first climber to actually make bouldering his primary specialty (in the mid 1950s) and to advocate its acceptance as a legitimate sport not restricted to a particular area was John Gill, a mathematician and amateur gymnast who found the challenge and movement of bouldering enjoyable. Boulder routes are commonly referred to as problems because the nature of the climb is often short, curious, and much like problem solving...
  • Bouldering
    Bouldering is a style of rock climbing undertaken without a rope and normally limited to very short climbs over a crash pad so that a fall will not result in serious injury. Bouldering's documented origins may be found in Europe in the last quarter of the 19th century. The British coined the words bouldering and problem at that time. The first climber to actually make bouldering his primary specialty (in the mid 1950s) and to advocate its acceptance as a legitimate sport not restricted to a particular area was John Gill, a mathematician and amateur gymnast who found the challenge and movement of bouldering enjoyable. Boulder routes are commonly referred to as problems because the nature of the climb is often short, curious, and much like problem solving...
  • Bouldering
    Bouldering is a style of rock climbing undertaken without a rope and normally limited to very short climbs over a crash pad so that a fall will not result in serious injury. Bouldering's documented origins may be found in Europe in the last quarter of the 19th century. The British coined the words bouldering and problem at that time. The first climber to actually make bouldering his primary specialty (in the mid 1950s) and to advocate its acceptance as a legitimate sport not restricted to a particular area was John Gill, a mathematician and amateur gymnast who found the challenge and movement of bouldering enjoyable. Boulder routes are commonly referred to as problems because the nature of the climb is often short, curious, and much like problem solving...
  • Bouldering
    Bouldering is a style of rock climbing undertaken without a rope and normally limited to very short climbs over a crash pad so that a fall will not result in serious injury. Bouldering's documented origins may be found in Europe in the last quarter of the 19th century. The British coined the words bouldering and problem at that time. The first climber to actually make bouldering his primary specialty (in the mid 1950s) and to advocate its acceptance as a legitimate sport not restricted to a particular area was John Gill, a mathematician and amateur gymnast who found the challenge and movement of bouldering enjoyable. Boulder routes are commonly referred to as problems because the nature of the climb is often short, curious, and much like problem solving...
  • Bouldering...
    Bouldering... ... is a style of rock climbing undertaken without a rope and normally limited to very short climbs over a crash pad so that a fall will not result in serious injury. Bouldering's documented origins may be found in Europe in the last quarter of the 19th century. The British coined the words bouldering and problem at that time. The first climber to actually make bouldering his primary specialty (in the mid 1950s) and to advocate its acceptance as a legitimate sport not restricted to a particular area was John Gill, a mathematician and amateur gymnast who found the challenge and movement of bouldering enjoyable. Boulder routes are commonly referred to as problems because the nature of the climb is often short, curious, and much like problem solving...
  •  Bouldering...
    Boulderingg... ... is a style of rock climbing undertaken without a rope and normally limited to very short climbs over a crash pad so that a fall will not result in serious injury. Bouldering's documented origins may be found in Europe in the last quarter of the 19th century. The British coined the words bouldering and problem at that time. The first climber to actually make bouldering his primary specialty (in the mid 1950s) and to advocate its acceptance as a legitimate sport not restricted to a particular area was John Gill, a mathematician and amateur gymnast who found the challenge and movement of bouldering enjoyable. Boulder routes are commonly referred to as problems because the nature of the climb is often short, curious, and much like problem solving...
  • Bouldering...
    Bouldering... ... is a style of rock climbing undertaken without a rope and normally limited to very short climbs over a crash pad so that a fall will not result in serious injury. Bouldering's documented origins may be found in Europe in the last quarter of the 19th century. The British coined the words bouldering and problem at that time. The first climber to actually make bouldering his primary specialty (in the mid 1950s) and to advocate its acceptance as a legitimate sport not restricted to a particular area was John Gill, a mathematician and amateur gymnast who found the challenge and movement of bouldering enjoyable. Boulder routes are commonly referred to as problems because the nature of the climb is often short, curious, and much like problem solving...
  • Bouldering...
    Bouldering... ... is a style of rock climbing undertaken without a rope and normally limited to very short climbs over a crash pad so that a fall will not result in serious injury. Bouldering's documented origins may be found in Europe in the last quarter of the 19th century. The British coined the words bouldering and problem at that time. The first climber to actually make bouldering his primary specialty (in the mid 1950s) and to advocate its acceptance as a legitimate sport not restricted to a particular area was John Gill, a mathematician and amateur gymnast who found the challenge and movement of bouldering enjoyable. Boulder routes are commonly referred to as problems because the nature of the climb is often short, curious, and much like problem solving...
  • Bouldering...
    Bouldering... ... is a style of rock climbing undertaken without a rope and normally limited to very short climbs over a crash pad so that a fall will not result in serious injury. Bouldering's documented origins may be found in Europe in the last quarter of the 19th century. The British coined the words bouldering and problem at that time. The first climber to actually make bouldering his primary specialty (in the mid 1950s) and to advocate its acceptance as a legitimate sport not restricted to a particular area was John Gill, a mathematician and amateur gymnast who found the challenge and movement of bouldering enjoyable. Boulder routes are commonly referred to as problems because the nature of the climb is often short, curious, and much like problem solving...
  • Bouldering...
    Bouldering... ... is a style of rock climbing undertaken without a rope and normally limited to very short climbs over a crash pad so that a fall will not result in serious injury. Bouldering's documented origins may be found in Europe in the last quarter of the 19th century. The British coined the words bouldering and problem at that time. The first climber to actually make bouldering his primary specialty (in the mid 1950s) and to advocate its acceptance as a legitimate sport not restricted to a particular area was John Gill, a mathematician and amateur gymnast who found the challenge and movement of bouldering enjoyable. Boulder routes are commonly referred to as problems because the nature of the climb is often short, curious, and much like problem solving...
Sonntag, 28 Juni 2009 16:26

Bouldering @ Atlantiswand, Kochel

geschrieben von 

 

Warum eigentlich immer wieder Kochel? Und warum immer dieser kleine überhängende Sektor rechts an der grausigen Atlantiswand? Gibt es denn nichts anderes für die Münchner-Highend-Boulderszene?

Nein, denn das Wetter lässt oft über Wochen nichts anderes zu, als das Bouldern an dem vielleicht staubigsten Eck des Alpenvorlandes. Staubig deshalb, da immer trocken - und da wären wir auch schon wieder bei DEM Grund, warum immer wieder hier neue Kreationen entstehen.


 

Bokassa's Fridge - Assassin, Monkey and man, März 2009

DAS soll eine neue Kreation sein? Böse Zungen könnten jetzt behaupten, dass sie den bzw. die Namen aus der Überschrift bereits kennen oder im Zusammenhang mit Kochel bereits gehört haben. Also, was ist das jetzt wieder für ein Kombinationstrick da? (read Toni's account in English here)

Das ganze fing für mich als Trainings-Spielchen an. Nachdem ich im letzten Jahr mit dem "Assassin, Monkey and Man" den für mich schwersten Boulder geknackt hatte, konnte ich mich endlich neuen Dingen zuwenden. Auf ein Projekt folgen bekanntlich immer andere Projekte - für diese war ich aber im Herbst zu schwach. Da entstand die Idee, im "Assassin" ein bißchen aufzutrainieren. Wer die abgefahrenen Power-Züge einmal probiert hat, der kann vielleicht nachvollziehen, dass es immer wieder Spaß macht, an dem 7m langen Schiffsbug herumzuturnen.

Leider war mein Ernährungsplan a bisserl zu Fett- und Proteinreich zur Weihnachtszeit und der Kochler Kalk ein wenig zu instabil, um der anhaltenden Gewichts-Inflation standzuhalten. Das Ergebnis war eine neue Griffsequenz unten, ein härterer Zug im Mittelteil und vor allem ein verschärftes Verbrennungs-Programm für meinen mittleren Körperbereich. Eine Kreuzbein-Verletzung vor Sylvester machte allerdings so manche Trainings-Einheit zu nichte. Einmal traf mich sogar eine Hexe mit gezieltem Rücken-Schuss. Erst Mitte Februar konnte ich (10 kg leichter) wieder schmerzfrei anreissen und hatte plötzlich alle Projekte erledigt.

Doch da gab' es ja noch das Trainingsprojekt, welches nach den "baulichen" Veränderungen schwerer als je zuvor erschien. Ich versuchte jetzt die direktere Linienführung vom Einstieg weg durchzuklettern und so entstand nach über 100 Versuchen, 30 Klettertagen bzw. 4 Monaten das neue Kochel-Highlight. 

Wie heißt es so schön: Der König ist tot, lang lebe der König - denn viel verändert hat sich der "Assassin" bzw. der "Bokassa's Fridge" nach außen hin nicht. Aber jetzt ist der markante Schiffsbug noch härter, direkter, powriger, anhaltender und vielleicht schöner geworden ... und er wartet vor allem noch sehnsüchtiger auf junges Fleisch, welches er in seinen Bann ziehen kann, um es in tage-, wochen- oder jahrelange Abhängigkeit zu bringen, so wie es bei mir offensichtlich erfolgreich gelungen ist. Ob ich mich jemals da von diesem Schiffsbug (gedanklich) loseisen kann, wird die Zukunft zeigen. Vielleicht gibt es ja noch die eine oder andere Kombinationsmöglichkeit (zumindest in meinen Kopf). Vor Ort dürfte jetzt Schluss sein, denn direkter und schwerer dürfte es nicht mehr gehen.
 
Der Name ist übrigens ähnlich wie die kletternde Synergie aller Griffmöglichkeiten eine logische Zusammensetzung aller geschichtlichen Vorgänger: "Bokassa's Fridge - Assassin, Monkey and Man".
 
Auch der Grad ist nur eine logische Erweiterung (allerdings auf einer erfundenen Skala), welcher wohl erst in der Zukunft durch andere "Press-Boulder-Liebhaber" auf seinen Wahrheitsgehalt überprüft werden wird. Allen solchen Aspiranten wünsche ich aber schon mal ebenso viel Freude damit ...

Bokassa's Fridge-Assassin, Monkey and man, March 2009

It was a lucky day, when I did my hardest problem so far, because I needed 6 tries on that day and I don't wanna tell you where I fell before succeding. The whole thing started as a training game. There are two hard variations in Kochel that I climbed in the last years, the "Assassin" and "Bokassa's Fridge". Both have a week point avoiding the total straight line. So the training game was to try the straight link-up. I used it as training game, because I had the long-term target to climb a hard project this summer (maybe for the last time - think of my age) in my mind, but I used it to get fit for some boulder-projects, too. Because of my job I can't travel so much anymore and the weather didn't allow a lot of choices bouldering-wise. That's the reason why there's only Kochel (45 min away) left, as one of the only spots, that is try - no matter how ugly the weather is.
I sort of trained in the straight-project after I couldn't do any moves on other boulder-projects, just to get strong again. That's what I did last autumn. It was the first time since years without a winter break for me and although I broke two crucial holds (caused by some inflative weight-gain around christmas) I really liked trying this thing. I snapped a little edge and a sidepull, leaving a "real" new project. After an injury in Ticino (I fell really bad on my a... and injured the sacral-bone) I got into that health-healing trip, avoiding alcohol and bad food. I tried bouldering and of course I tried THE project - managing to do it in 3 parts. But the injury didn't get better in the first 4 or 5 weeks, because I never really stopped bouldering and in the end of January I got really painfull Ischias-problems as well. After a two weeks break I started again. Almost 10 kilos lighter and without the pain in my back my climbing improved really fast and I did the thing with one rest mid of February. I climbed a few other projects at home and in albarracin and when I came back it seemed the right time to attack it seriously.
It is hard to compare "Bokassa's Fridge-Assassin, Monkey and man" to other climbs, because for me it started as a game and ended (after some holds changed) as the new bouldering-highlight in front of my home. I wouldn't consider it as a great line if it would be anywhere else, but at home it is something that you can try every day. It has nice, powerfull and of course long moves along a 6m high prow and the rock is always try. What else can you expect, if you don't have the time to drive to new places and don't want to go to the gym. It just happens, that you climb things like this one... . The name is similar to the climb a combination of the two "old" boulder. 

Toni


Assasin, Monkey and Man, April 2008

Regardless how future climbers will rate it, this is a new school line with nightmarishly intricate and complicated moves along a prow on typical "no friction" Kochel limestone.

Toni's ascent came as a bit of surprise anyhow, since when I shot him three weeks ago he was still changing sequences (see clip above) and could do "Assasin, Monkey and Man" with two hangs at the very best.  Never in the history of bouldering Albert Einstein's saying "It's not that I'm so smart, it's just that I stay with problems longer."  was more true than with Toni's approach to "Assasin". And than, on April 9th: "Am Mittwoch wars der absolute Hammer: Föhnsturm bei 10 Grad und super Grip am Abend - wie hingepappt! Bin letzten Freitag bereits einmal ins obere Drittel gekommen und ab dem Airwalk rausgeklettert - wusste also das Ding ist bald fällig... und mit a bisserl Glück (Wind!)..."

Read on what Toni has to say about his 2008 masterpiece ASSASSIN, MONKEY AND MAN(in German and below in English)...

Neuer schwerer Boulder. So lang, so schwer, Schlüsselstelle am... . Ähhh, vielleicht sollte ich eher so anfangen:

„Assassin, monkey and man" ist die Geschichte einer nahezu romantischen Beziehung zwischen einem, auf den ersten Blick nicht unbedingt ästhetisch anmutenden Stück Fels und seines, in die Jahre kommenden Erschließers. Nach einer fast 2 Jahre andauernden Boulderpause ist der Stier von Kochel doppelt gehandicapt: einst der stärkste Boulderer weit und breit, schnappt er jetzt nicht nur langsamer als früher, sondern scheint auch nichts mehr Neues vor der Haustür finden. „Assassin, monkey and man", den zu Fels gewordenen, 8 Meter langen Boulderkampf, nimmt er zunächst nicht wahr, bis...

{mosg2image blocks=specificItem itemId=18342 show=fullSize maxSize=440}

  (above: Toni Lamprecht bouldering "Assassin, monkey and man")  

... zum Dezember 2007: Toni steht eigentlich schon vor dem Ende seiner Amtszeit als Boulderstier von Kochel und ist im Begriff, die atlantischen Boulderhemisphären nach erfolgreicher 10-jähriger Verwaltung entgültig zu verlassen. Kurz vor der Jahreswende erlangt ihn jedoch die Gewissheit, dass ein, von ihm 2 Jahre zuvor gelöstes Problem, „Bokassa's Fridge", noch solange auf seine Verlängerung nach oben und unten warten würde, bis es entgültig „besiegt" ist. Toni steht vor dem Zwiespalt, die neue Entdeckung der nächsten Generation zu übergeben, oder sich jetzt dem Kampf zu stellen. Da er nicht den Rest seines Lebens vor diesem letzten „Gegner" davonlaufen möchte, versucht er zunächst, Hilfskräfte zu finden, was ihm auch erfolgreich gelingt: ein junger Freund lässt sich als Begleiter ein, der Boulder-Stammtisch trifft regelmäßig zusammen, im örtlichen Kiosk begegnet man ihm mit offener Unterstützung und sogar das Wetter zeigt sich von der konstant kühlen Seite. Damit wird auch die ehemalige Außenseiterrolle des staubigen Sektors in der jungen Szene in ein neues Licht gerückt: Die Atlantiswand wird plötzlich zum Lieblingsspielplatz der jungen Wilden, denn jeder neue, fitte Boulderer brennt nur darauf, die jahrelang unwiederholten Probleme zu knacken. Genau während dieser Phase tritt der Boulderrentner mit ungeahnten Kräften aus dem Ruhestand hervor und die jahrzehntelange Liason zwischen Toni und der
Atlantiswand wird aufgefrischt..
Als der neue Ausstieg („There's something in my bedroom") Ende Januar gefallen ist, und Toni den Absprung in den sicheren Tod durch Plateau-Bauten entschärft hat, macht er sich unerschrocken über den um ebenfalls 6 Züge erweiterten Startboulder her. Er erkennt schon bald, dass der Schlüssel für die Lösung des Mittelteils im Herzen des „Antonator"s liegt, dem früheren Kernstück der High-End-Szenerie, SEINEM Boulder, dem späteren Projekt von Nachtboulderer Konrad Bauer und schließlich das von Shooting-Star Chris Münch.

 

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(above: Chris Münch repeating "Antonator")

Angespornt durch die Wiederholungen dieser neuen Protagonisten geht auch Toni mit alter
Borniertheit an sein Projekt. Zug um Zug wird dieses wochenlangen zur Geduldsprobe. 3 Monate und 36 Klettertage später ist dann eine der längsten Begehungszeiten (und auch eine der vermutlich dunkelsten) der Kochler Bouldergeschichte zu sehen. Dabei lehnt Toni ursprünglich als überzeugter Tagkletterer jede Lichtquellentechnik ab. Später benutzt er, durch die immer länger andauernden Bouldersessions, sogar mehrere Stirnlampen und bis zu 6 Bouldermatten gleichzeitig, und erntet den Erfolg des Durchstiegs: Nachdem der „Assassin" eines Abends alleine ist, wird er von Toni in einem dramatischen Showdown besiegt.
Am Ende bleibt die Frage übrig, ob Toni - nachdem die Verfechter der jungen, immer stärker
werdenden Szene zusammenkommen, um ihn ein letztes Mal zu feiern - die „Stier-von-Kochel-Auszeichnung" wegwerfen wird, da ihm klar geworden sein dürfte, dass dieses letzte Aufbäumen gegen die neue Generation irgendwann ein Ende haben wird ....

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(above: Chris Münch repeating "Antonator")

Harte Fakten:
„Assassin, monkey and man" ist ein 8 Meter langer, bedrohlich wirkender Schiffsbug über einem großen Staubplateau mitten in der abgespeckten Kochler Boulderwelt Atlantis, der das ganze Repertoire moderner Boulderkunst abruft: vom blind ausgeführten Dyno, über wildes Gepatsche, bis zu feinfühligen Toe- und Heel-Hook – hier wird alles geboten. Nachdem der Einstieg über die leichtere „Eulenvariante" des „Antonators" überwunden ist, warten 7 harte Züge im Mittelteil. Auf Höhe der Schlüsselstelle des klassischen „Antonators" steigt aber nicht nach links in die nebenliegende Verschneidung aus, da diese tabu ist! Stattdessen folgt man der eigentlichen Linie entlang des Schiffbugs und erreicht schließlich nach weiteren 12 weiten Zügen das Ende der vertretbaren Boulderhöhe: einen Henkel links im Riss. 25 Züge kombinieren so einen komplexen 8b+ bloc-Boulder mit einem highballartigen Fb 8a+ bloc- Ausstieg zum ultimativen Pressfestival, welches eine lilablassblaue Gesichtsfarbe garantiert.

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(above: Toni Lamprecht tried "Assassin, monkey and man" over a 3 month period)   

Und da sind wir auch schon bei der...

Bewertung

Es könnten jetzt die typischen Sätze folgen wie „Mein schwerster Boulder seit Jahren" oder  „So etwas habe ich noch nie zuvor probiert", welche ja durchaus ihre Richtigkeit hätten, irgendwie aber zu abgedroschen klingen. Wie wäre es denn mit „der erste 8c+ Boulder in Kochel" ? Tja, eigentlich sollte das Ding aber gar nicht bewertet werden, sondern einfach nur mit „Abgefahren", „Bouldernswert" oder „Unbedingt Probierbar" tituliert werden, sowie es im Kochler Boulderführer sowieso der Fall ist. Schwerer als die anderen Sachen in Kochel ist es aber dann doch. Also, was tun? Aus Respekt vor ähnlich harten Bouldern, welche von ihren Erstbegehern mit „nur 8c bloc" bewertet wurden, um einer Inflation nach oben hin vorzubeugen, käme sowieso „nur 8c" in Frage. Aber müssten dann alle anderen Sachen an der Atlantiswand gar abgewertet werden? „Real 8c" – mit stetiger Abwertung aller bisheriger Boulder, doch wer kann das den Boulderern zumuten, welche gerade ihre erste 8a gemacht haben und jetzt „nur noch 7c+" dazu sagen dürfen. Was tun? Hart 8c? Ja, warum nicht? Hart 8c. Genau: „Hart 8c"!  Und die Zukunft wird zeigen, ob es stimmt. Also auf, ihr Dave Graham's, Adam Ondra's und Daniel Wood's – das Ding beißt nicht! Allerdings hat der Boulder bei genauerer Betrachtung auch ein Manko: die Weigerung, sich auf die linke Verschneidungswand einzulassen mag ja nicht jedermanns Sache sein, fällt aber beim Probieren nicht weiter störend auf – ehrlich! Nur ohne Verschneidung ist es halt sauschwer. Und wer möchte, kann immer noch eine leichte Variante MIT Verschneidung daraus machen. Zum Abschluss noch was...

...Geschichtliches

Entdeckt wurde die komplette Linie übrigens schon 2006, während einer Bouldersession mit einem der größten Boulderer Deutschlands. Die komplette Linie wich zunächst dem Teilstück „Bokassa's Fridge" – benannt nach einer Starnberger Indy-Band.
Deren zweiter Veröffentlichung ist dann auch der komplette Bouldername angelehnt.

ASSASSIN, MONKEY AND MAN, Toni's personal account in English

„Assassin, monkey and man" is the story of a romantic relationship between a piece of rock and his 36-year old challenger. After a two year boulder-break Toni, in the past the "raging bull of kochel" is double handicapped: slower in dynos and idealess in finding hard boulder-projects. Around christmas he gets the awareness, that "Bokassa's Fridge", the hardest boulder-problem of Kochel would only be completed with a sit-start and a highball-finish. Toni is mobilicing all his friends, heaps of crashpads and spotters to try the new project „Assassin" with before unknown power-ressources:  After completing the highball-finish "There's something in my bedroom", Fb 8a+ (V12) in January, I started to work the lower part. Soon I found out, that the crux would be to get as fresh as possible into the hard part of "Bokassa's Fridge", Fb 8c (V15) after doing 6 moves more before. As the weeks passed, I tried the sequences again and again, until I could do the whole boulder problem with 2-3 rests beginning of march. Another 4 weeks of trying and changing methods, after a total of 36 days of trying and working the 8m long prow, I got the big chance. On a perfect-like day, with a strong wind to improve the crip on the frictionless limestone, I started in the already diminished daylight to make a last try – with success: By the assistance of 4 (head-)lamps, 6 crashpads and the dry, stormlike conditions I finished the climb and did the first ascent of "Assassin, monkey and man" in the evening of April the 9th. Facts: „Assassin, monkey and man" is an 8m long prow on the base of a climbing cliff (Altantiswand) in Kochel, South of Germany. The overhanging and polished limestone allowes the climber to show all his skills from blind-folded dynos over sloper-compression to tricky heel- and toe-hook-work. After 6 "easy", but athletic moves on the sit-start follows the 7 moves long crux part. Leaving the hardest moves you slap up the top part of the prow with another 12 body-eating and desperate moves, until you reach a big jug and easier ground. 25 moves in total combine an 8b+ (V14)- with an 8a+ (V12)-part to an ultimate body-tension festival, which garantees a fill-body workout and a highpurple head-color. I already looked at the complete line back in 2006, but first ascented the "smaller" version "Bokassa's Fridge" – named after the German Independent-Punk-Band. "Assassin, monkey and man" is their second released album.

Gradings from a personal point of view

To describe the effort put into an ascent like that, there could be used sentences like „This is the hardest climb, that I know" or "My hardest boulder" with true correctness, but used and heard to many times. So what to do? Grade it 8a, 8b, 8c or more? No grade at all? Or a description instead like "Please try it, its good and doesn't bite at all", "Crazy stuff" combined with a personal guided tour for good friends? I would call it harder than the other boulders in Kochel, but does that mean it can be meassured with all the other hard stuff out there, that I haven't even seen nor touched? In respect of certain really strong guys that haven't graded harder than Fb 8c (V15) to stop the inflation of the grades, there would be no way to call it harder than Fb 8c (V15) anyway. To call it less would mean to downgrade other problems I did in the past and frustrate others. I simply take the easiest solution and call it "Hard"… . The exact number after this four letter word should be filled by more experienced boulders in the future, that are welcomed to try it
anytime!
More important is that "Assassin, monkey and man" - even without an exact number – marks a new step for me, that I only could reach by copying the desperate motivation of the young generation. So thanks a lot to all the energy-loaded folks out there, who made this possible!!! 

 

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(above: Nikki "Spreisl" Schramm repeating "Jenseits von Jena")   


Chronologie der wichtigsten Begehungen am Antonator-Sektor:

1986: 1. Begehung von „Kontagan", 7a bloc durch Thomas Starke

1997: 1. Begehung des „Antonator", 8b bloc (T.L.)

1998: 1. Begehung des „Lindenthaler", 8a? bloc (vor Griffausbruch) als Linksvariante durch Uli Lindenthal

2000: 1. Begehung von „Jenseits von Jena", 8a(+) bloc (T.L.)

2004: 1. Begehung von „Milupa", 8a (T.L.)

2006: 1. Begehung von „Snowcrash", 8a bloc (T.L.)

2006: 1. Variante zum „Lindenthaler", 7c bloc über das Eulennest (?)

2006: 1. Begehung von „Bokassa's Fridge", 8c bloc (Originalstart) (T.L.)

2007: 2. Begehung der Originalvariante des „Antonator"'s, 8b bloc durch Konrad Bauer

2008: 1. Begehung von „There's something in my bedroom", 8a+ bloc durch Toni Lamprecht

2008: 3. Begehung der Originalvariante des „Antonator"'s, 8b bloc durch Chris Münch

2008: 1. Variante zum „Antonator", 8a bloc über das Eulennest (?)

2008: 1. Begehung von „Assassin, Monkey and Man", Hart 8c bloc (T.L.)

2009: 1. Begehung von „Bokassa's Fridge - Assassin, Monkey and Man", 8c+ bloc (T.L.)  

 

 

 

Gelesen 22020 mal Letzte Änderung am Freitag, 25 November 2011 14:59
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