• Climbing...
    Climbing... ... is the activity of using one's hands and feet (or indeed any other part of the body) to ascend a steep object. Climbing might be the oldest form of locomotion of Human Beings since it stems from the arboreal locomotion of our ancestors in the trees. Many of the same principles may be applied to climbing on rock or artificial structures. Nowadays it is done both for recreation (to reach an inaccessible place, or for its own enjoyment), as a sport (see the "competition" section of this site) or as part of activities such as maintenance of a structure. Here we deal with Sport Climbing in which the climber uses quickdraws to clip onto permanent bolts in the rock, and thus clips the rope into each quickdraw as she or he climbs up and with the so called Traditional or Clean climbing in which bolts, nuts, hexes and camming devices are employed and taken from the rock after the ascent (hence "clean"). You find most of the other sub- categories of climbing in the corresponding section of this site.
  • Climbing...
    Climbing... ... is the activity of using one's hands and feet (or indeed any other part of the body) to ascend a steep object. Climbing might be the oldest form of locomotion of Human Beings since it stems from the arboreal locomotion of our ancestors in the trees. Many of the same principles may be applied to climbing on rock or artificial structures. Nowadays it is done both for recreation (to reach an inaccessible place, or for its own enjoyment), as a sport (see the "competition" section of this site) or as part of activities such as maintenance of a structure. Here we deal with Sport Climbing in which the climber uses quickdraws to clip onto permanent bolts in the rock, and thus clips the rope into each quickdraw as she or he climbs up and with the so called Traditional or Clean climbing in which bolts, nuts, hexes and camming devices are employed and taken from the rock after the ascent (hence "clean"). You find most of the other sub- categories of climbing in the corresponding section of this site.
  • Climbing...
    Climbing... ... is the activity of using one's hands and feet (or indeed any other part of the body) to ascend a steep object. Climbing might be the oldest form of locomotion of Human Beings since it stems from the arboreal locomotion of our ancestors in the trees. Many of the same principles may be applied to climbing on rock or artificial structures. Nowadays it is done both for recreation (to reach an inaccessible place, or for its own enjoyment), as a sport (see the "competition" section of this site) or as part of activities such as maintenance of a structure. Here we deal with Sport Climbing in which the climber uses quickdraws to clip onto permanent bolts in the rock, and thus clips the rope into each quickdraw as she or he climbs up and with the so called Traditional or Clean climbing in which bolts, nuts, hexes and camming devices are employed and taken from the rock after the ascent (hence "clean"). You find most of the other sub- categories of climbing in the corresponding section of this site.
  • Climbing...
    Climbing... ... is the activity of using one's hands and feet (or indeed any other part of the body) to ascend a steep object. Climbing might be the oldest form of locomotion of Human Beings since it stems from the arboreal locomotion of our ancestors in the trees. Many of the same principles may be applied to climbing on rock or artificial structures. Nowadays it is done both for recreation (to reach an inaccessible place, or for its own enjoyment), as a sport (see the "competition" section of this site) or as part of activities such as maintenance of a structure. Here we deal with Sport Climbing in which the climber uses quickdraws to clip onto permanent bolts in the rock, and thus clips the rope into each quickdraw as she or he climbs up and with the so called Traditional or Clean climbing in which bolts, nuts, hexes and camming devices are employed and taken from the rock after the ascent (hence "clean"). You find most of the other sub- categories of climbing in the corresponding section of this site.
  • Climbing...
    Climbing... ... is the activity of using one's hands and feet (or indeed any other part of the body) to ascend a steep object. Climbing might be the oldest form of locomotion of Human Beings since it stems from the arboreal locomotion of our ancestors in the trees. Many of the same principles may be applied to climbing on rock or artificial structures. Nowadays it is done both for recreation (to reach an inaccessible place, or for its own enjoyment), as a sport (see the "competition" section of this site) or as part of activities such as maintenance of a structure. Here we deal with Sport Climbing in which the climber uses quickdraws to clip onto permanent bolts in the rock, and thus clips the rope into each quickdraw as she or he climbs up and with the so called Traditional or Clean climbing in which bolts, nuts, hexes and camming devices are employed and taken from the rock after the ascent (hence "clean"). You find most of the other sub- categories of climbing in the corresponding section of this site.
  • Climbing...
    Climbing... ... is the activity of using one's hands and feet (or indeed any other part of the body) to ascend a steep object. Climbing might be the oldest form of locomotion of Human Beings since it stems from the arboreal locomotion of our ancestors in the trees. Many of the same principles may be applied to climbing on rock or artificial structures. Nowadays it is done both for recreation (to reach an inaccessible place, or for its own enjoyment), as a sport (see the "competition" section of this site) or as part of activities such as maintenance of a structure. Here we deal with Sport Climbing in which the climber uses quickdraws to clip onto permanent bolts in the rock, and thus clips the rope into each quickdraw as she or he climbs up and with the so called Traditional or Clean climbing in which bolts, nuts, hexes and camming devices are employed and taken from the rock after the ascent (hence "clean"). You find most of the other sub- categories of climbing in the corresponding section of this site.
  • Climbing...
    Climbing... ... is the activity of using one's hands and feet (or indeed any other part of the body) to ascend a steep object. Climbing might be the oldest form of locomotion of Human Beings since it stems from the arboreal locomotion of our ancestors in the trees. Many of the same principles may be applied to climbing on rock or artificial structures. Nowadays it is done both for recreation (to reach an inaccessible place, or for its own enjoyment), as a sport (see the "competition" section of this site) or as part of activities such as maintenance of a structure. Here we deal with Sport Climbing in which the climber uses quickdraws to clip onto permanent bolts in the rock, and thus clips the rope into each quickdraw as she or he climbs up and with the so called Traditional or Clean climbing in which bolts, nuts, hexes and camming devices are employed and taken from the rock after the ascent (hence "clean"). You find most of the other sub- categories of climbing in the corresponding section of this site.
  • Climbing...
    Climbing... ... is the activity of using one's hands and feet (or indeed any other part of the body) to ascend a steep object. Climbing might be the oldest form of locomotion of Human Beings since it stems from the arboreal locomotion of our ancestors in the trees. Many of the same principles may be applied to climbing on rock or artificial structures. Nowadays it is done both for recreation (to reach an inaccessible place, or for its own enjoyment), as a sport (see the "competition" section of this site) or as part of activities such as maintenance of a structure. Here we deal with Sport Climbing in which the climber uses quickdraws to clip onto permanent bolts in the rock, and thus clips the rope into each quickdraw as she or he climbs up and with the so called Traditional or Clean climbing in which bolts, nuts, hexes and camming devices are employed and taken from the rock after the ascent (hence "clean"). You find most of the other sub- categories of climbing in the corresponding section of this site.
  • Climbing...
    Climbing... ... is the activity of using one's hands and feet (or indeed any other part of the body) to ascend a steep object. Climbing might be the oldest form of locomotion of Human Beings since it stems from the arboreal locomotion of our ancestors in the trees. Many of the same principles may be applied to climbing on rock or artificial structures. Nowadays it is done both for recreation (to reach an inaccessible place, or for its own enjoyment), as a sport (see the "competition" section of this site) or as part of activities such as maintenance of a structure. Here we deal with Sport Climbing in which the climber uses quickdraws to clip onto permanent bolts in the rock, and thus clips the rope into each quickdraw as she or he climbs up and with the so called Traditional or Clean climbing in which bolts, nuts, hexes and camming devices are employed and taken from the rock after the ascent (hence "clean"). You find most of the other sub- categories of climbing in the corresponding section of this site.
  • Climbing...
    Climbing... ... is the activity of using one's hands and feet (or indeed any other part of the body) to ascend a steep object. Climbing might be the oldest form of locomotion of Human Beings since it stems from the arboreal locomotion of our ancestors in the trees. Many of the same principles may be applied to climbing on rock or artificial structures. Nowadays it is done both for recreation (to reach an inaccessible place, or for its own enjoyment), as a sport (see the "competition" section of this site) or as part of activities such as maintenance of a structure. Here we deal with Sport Climbing in which the climber uses quickdraws to clip onto permanent bolts in the rock, and thus clips the rope into each quickdraw as she or he climbs up and with the so called Traditional or Clean climbing in which bolts, nuts, hexes and camming devices are employed and taken from the rock after the ascent (hence "clean"). You find most of the other sub- categories of climbing in the corresponding section of this site.
  • Climbing...
    Climbing... ... is the activity of using one's hands and feet (or indeed any other part of the body) to ascend a steep object. Climbing might be the oldest form of locomotion of Human Beings since it stems from the arboreal locomotion of our ancestors in the trees. Many of the same principles may be applied to climbing on rock or artificial structures. Nowadays it is done both for recreation (to reach an inaccessible place, or for its own enjoyment), as a sport (see the "competition" section of this site) or as part of activities such as maintenance of a structure. Here we deal with Sport Climbing in which the climber uses quickdraws to clip onto permanent bolts in the rock, and thus clips the rope into each quickdraw as she or he climbs up and with the so called Traditional or Clean climbing in which bolts, nuts, hexes and camming devices are employed and taken from the rock after the ascent (hence "clean"). You find most of the other sub- categories of climbing in the corresponding section of this site.
  • Climbing...
    Climbing... ... is the activity of using one's hands and feet (or indeed any other part of the body) to ascend a steep object. Climbing might be the oldest form of locomotion of Human Beings since it stems from the arboreal locomotion of our ancestors in the trees. Many of the same principles may be applied to climbing on rock or artificial structures. Nowadays it is done both for recreation (to reach an inaccessible place, or for its own enjoyment), as a sport (see the "competition" section of this site) or as part of activities such as maintenance of a structure. Here we deal with Sport Climbing in which the climber uses quickdraws to clip onto permanent bolts in the rock, and thus clips the rope into each quickdraw as she or he climbs up and with the so called Traditional or Clean climbing in which bolts, nuts, hexes and camming devices are employed and taken from the rock after the ascent (hence "clean"). You find most of the other sub- categories of climbing in the corresponding section of this site.
  • Climbing...
    Climbing... ... is the activity of using one's hands and feet (or indeed any other part of the body) to ascend a steep object. Climbing might be the oldest form of locomotion of Human Beings since it stems from the arboreal locomotion of our ancestors in the trees. Many of the same principles may be applied to climbing on rock or artificial structures. Nowadays it is done both for recreation (to reach an inaccessible place, or for its own enjoyment), as a sport (see the "competition" section of this site) or as part of activities such as maintenance of a structure. Here we deal with Sport Climbing in which the climber uses quickdraws to clip onto permanent bolts in the rock, and thus clips the rope into each quickdraw as she or he climbs up and with the so called Traditional or Clean climbing in which bolts, nuts, hexes and camming devices are employed and taken from the rock after the ascent (hence "clean"). You find most of the other sub- categories of climbing in the corresponding section of this site.
Montag, 11 Mai 2009 14:28

Les Marches du temps en libre

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In summer 2006 Toni Lamprecht bolted a line next to the ugly bolt ladder in the ninth pitch of "Les Marches du Temps" in the Verdon. Weather was very bad at this time of the year, but easter 2007 he and Uli Strunz had no problems with the now 8a pitch. They did the whole route without falls. Les Marches du Temps is another great free Verdon route with lots of exposed and challenging pitches. Udini filmed Uli and Toni during the process of finding the line, cleaning and bolting and, well, finally climbing it for the upcoming "2nd Licence to climb" DVD.  Also we started a Verdon Gallery here, with photos shot during our stays. Here is what Toni has to say about their ascent (in German):
"Seit Jahren gehört die Route „Marches du Temps" von Michel Suhubiette für mich mit „La Fete de Nerfs" und „Gwendal" zu den schönsten langen Routen im Verdon: 3 Sterne für 11 Seillängen, ziemlich konstant zwischen 6c und 7a verteilt, jedoch eine 6cA0-Bohrhakenleiter in der 9. Länge, welche schon beim Abseilen über die Route unkletterbar erscheint. 2 Meter links der Originallinie entdecke ich im April 2004 einen angedeuteten, zerfressenen Sinter und so wird „Marches du temps" in den nächsten Jahren zu einem meiner letzten ungelösten Freikletter-Probleme...  

Mitte August 2005 bouldern Uli Strunz und ich das erste Mal ernsthaft in der Länge herum. Nach mehreren Stunden Schweiß- und Unterarmkraftverbrauch haben wir die Länge mit einer haarsträubenden Kratzerpassage mit Seilsicherung von oben durchgeklettert. 8b ist es so aber mindestens! Ein Durchstieg der gesamten Route ist jetzt das Ziel. Ein Jahr später, im heißen August 2006 probieren Uli und ich die Seillänge auf einer vollständig unabhängigen Linie links der Originallinie. Die Kletterei wird so noch leichter, da die kratzige Stelle im oberen Teil durch eine viel angenehmer zu kletternde Passage links umgangen werden kann. Es könnte eine der besten Routen werden, doch leider ist das Wetter nicht auf unserer Seite, denn 35°C Lufttemperatur, heftige Sonneneinstrahlung im Wechselspiel mit Gewitterschauern, eine nasse Schlüsselstelle und das baldige Urlaubende machen uns beim Durchstiegsversuch stets einen Strich durch die Rechnung. Anstatt zu klettern, jümaren wir das eine oder andere Mal die letzten Längen nur noch im Nassen oder Dunklen raus.

Im April 2007 ist es aber so weit. Nach 200m Abseilen folgt eine Traumlänge nach der anderen. Uli und ich klettern überschlagend, lassen die ersten 8 Seillängen sturzfrei hinter uns hängen schon bald am Stand unter der Schlüssellänge. Keine der wackeligen schweren Stellen wirft uns diesmal ab. Nachdem jeder einmal die Länge gepunktet hat, sind die letzten zwei leichten Längen nur noch eine Pflicht-Kür für die Beendigung der ersten, absolut sturzfreien Team-Begehung.

Fazit: Obwohl die freie Begehung der „Marches du temps", 8a bei weitem nicht meine schwerste Erstbegehung war und schon gar nicht die Bedeutsamste im Verdon, ist sie für Uli und für mich nach diesem gemeinsamen Erlebnis aber die „Schönste" in der Schlucht!"
Gelesen 11000 mal Letzte Änderung am Mittwoch, 16 November 2011 16:42